Live Culture | Seven Days | Vermont's Independent Voice

Wednesday, January 2, 2019

Seven Days Photographer Matthew Thorsen Dies at 51

Posted By on Wed, Jan 2, 2019 at 3:55 PM

Matthew Thorsen - MELANIE MARIA GOODREAUX
  • Melanie Maria Goodreaux
  • Matthew Thorsen
We're deeply saddened to report the death, from cancer, of  Seven Days' longtime beloved staff photographer Matthew Thorsen. Though expected, his passing — on New Year's Day 2019 — is nonetheless devastating to us all.

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Thursday, December 27, 2018

Cultural Mosaic: Rapper K Prince Encourages Positive Thinking

Posted By on Thu, Dec 27, 2018 at 6:00 AM

Kahambwe Prince Felekeni - KYMELYA SARI
  • Kymelya Sari
  • Kahambwe Prince Felekeni
Local rapper Kahambwe Prince Felekeni, 22, said he first heard Tupac Shakur's music when he was in a refugee camp in Tanzania. The American hip-hop artist died in the same year that he was born.

“That’s how powerful music is,” said Felekeni, who also goes by the moniker K Prince. “You can be gone, but your voice is still heard.”

Earlier this month, Felekeni released a music video for "Young King." The song’s main message, he said, is this: “If you want something, you can’t just wait for someone to bring it to you.” Winooski-based Que Beats produced the music video, which was filmed at Battery Park and the Boys & Girls Club of Burlington.

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Friday, December 21, 2018

Binge-Watch Local Programming on Your Holiday Break

Posted By on Fri, Dec 21, 2018 at 12:06 PM

DANIL KORSHUNOV | DREAMSTIME.COM
  • Danil Korshunov | Dreamstime.com
The holiday season is at hand, and there's no doubt you're looking forward to everything that comes with it: family gatherings, office parties and, of course, figuring out how you'll spend New Year's Eve.

But let's be real. It's been a tough 12 months, and all you really want to do on your end-of-year vacay is throw on your Snuggie and plop down on the couch with a big bowl of popcorn. You've been putting off checking out a bunch of new streaming series until your holiday break, and you can practically hear "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel" calling out your name.

In the spirit of keeping things local, consider bumping the second season of "Making a Murderer" down the queue to make room for some locally sourced programming. Here are a few suggestions to get you started.

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Thursday, December 20, 2018

Cultural Mosaic: Shrishty Chhetri Wins Nepali Singing Competition

Posted By on Thu, Dec 20, 2018 at 6:00 AM

Shrishty Chhetri wins the Voice of Glory - COURTESY OF AARON'S PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Courtesy of Aaron's Photography
  • Shrishty Chhetri wins the Voice of Glory
According to Pahalman Darji, his family members are music lovers and enjoy watching reality singing shows. So when his teen daughter, Shrishty Chhetri, asked if she could take part in a singing competition, he and his wife gave her their full support.

Last month Chhetri, 16, was crowned the inaugural winner of the Voice of Glory, a Christian singing competition for Bhutanese-Nepali residents in the New England area. “I was in shock,” said the Burlington High School junior. “I never thought I would win.”

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Tuesday, December 18, 2018

Playwright, Actor and Burlington Icon Josh Bridgman Dies

Posted By on Tue, Dec 18, 2018 at 9:42 PM

Josh Bridgman - COURTESY OF GREEN CANDLE THEATRE CO.
  • Courtesy of Green Candle Theatre Co.
  • Josh Bridgman
If you've lived in Burlington at any point over the last 30 years or so, you likely knew Josh Bridgman, even if you never actually met him. He could often be found haunting the margins at one of his usual spots — Uncommon Grounds, Radio Bean or the Other Place.

Or you might have encountered him taking tickets at the downtown parking garage, where he worked for years. Perpetually rumpled and typically clad in his distinctive glasses and trench coat — and known for his equally distinctive and loud laugh — Bridgman was a Queen City fixture. 

"He was a guy that a lot of people knew just because he was out and about and had a peculiar look about him," said filmmaker Bill Simmon, former director of media services at VCAM. "So, whether you knew him or not, you knew of him if you lived in town."

Bridgman, 51, died unexpectedly earlier this week. As of this writing, the cause and time of death is unknown, pending an autopsy. Neither foul play nor suicide is suspected.

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Friday, December 14, 2018

Charlotte Potter Named Yestermorrow Executive Director

Posted By on Fri, Dec 14, 2018 at 4:04 PM

Charlotte Potter - COURTESY OF CHARLOTTE POTTER
  • Courtesy of Charlotte Potter
  • Charlotte Potter
On January 2, 2019, Charlotte Potter will take over as executive director at Yestermorrow Design/Build School in Waitsfield. It's a homecoming for the Mad River Valley native, who for the past six years worked as the glass studio manager and program director at the Chrysler Museum of Art in Norfolk, Va. She succeeds former Yestermorrow ED Claire Gear, who is now the executive director of the Shelburne Craft School.

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Friday, November 16, 2018

Nico Muhly on His Latest Opera, 'Marnie'

Posted By on Fri, Nov 16, 2018 at 1:42 PM

Isabel Leonard as Marnie (in yellow) with other cast members of 'Marnie' - KEN HOWARD/THE MET
  • Ken Howard/The Met
  • Isabel Leonard as Marnie (in yellow) with other cast members of 'Marnie'
In his latest opera, Vermont-born composer Nico Muhly, along with librettist Nicholas Wright,  reimagined Winston Graham's 1961 novel Marnie. The story follows a beautiful but troubled young woman who assumes multiple identities. Marnie, played by mezzo-soprano Isabel Leonard, compounds layers of deception as she drifts from job to job and lover to lover, eventually landing in the cruel, abusive grasp of a wealthy businessman, Mark Rutland, played by baritone Christopher Maltman.

The book inspired Alfred Hitchcock's disturbing 1964 film of the same name, in which the filmmaker used shuddering camera work and long, leering shots to render Marnie's increasing derangement. For his version, Muhly turns to music — specifically, his gift for mysterious tonality and dramatic composition — to convey the lead character's inner mania.

After premiering in London last year, Marnie opened at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City last month. It's the second Muhly opera commissioned by the Met. The first was his acclaimed  2013 work Two Boys.

Following a seven-show run, Marnie closed on November 10. If you missed it, either live or via one of the numerous "The Met: Live in HD" simulcasts, despair not. Town Hall Theater in Middlebury presents an encore broadcast of the opera this Sunday, November 18 — exactly one year to the day after it originally premiered in London. Seven Days recently caught up with Muhly by phone.

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Thursday, November 15, 2018

Six Vermont Artists and Art Advocates Recognized at Governor's Arts Awards

Posted By on Thu, Nov 15, 2018 at 3:43 PM

Jerry Williams, left, and Chris Miller - JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR
  • Jeb Wallace-Brodeur
  • Jerry Williams, left, and Chris Miller

Last evening,  November 14, Gov. Phil Scott and the Vermont Arts Council honored six Vermont artists at the annual Governor’s Arts Awards ceremony, held at the Statehouse in Montpelier.


This year’s Award for Excellence in the Arts went to two recipients, selected by Scott from among 20 nominees: Sculptors Chris Miller and Jerry Williams, who worked together on a new Ceres statue for the top of the Statehouse dome. (The previous one had rotted and was removed earlier this year.) The figure, an allegorical representation of Vermont’s agricultural heritage, will be installed on November 30.

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New Voices Series Showcases Local Korean and Ghanaian Drum Groups

Posted By on Thu, Nov 15, 2018 at 10:24 AM

Sori Mori - COURTESY OF THE FLYNN CENTER
  • Courtesy of the Flynn Center
  • Sori Mori
When Cindy Rancourt was living in her native country of South Korea, she wasn’t interested in Korean traditional music. But since moving to Vermont in 2006, the Essex resident has had a voracious appreciation for all things Korean.

Rancourt teaches at the Green Mountain Korean Culture School, helps out during the Korean Food Fest, practices taekwondo and attends a Korean church in Essex. She’s also a member of an all-female drumming troupe, Sori Mori, that performs in the samul nori folk style. These are all an expression of her “longing and yearning” for her home country, said Rancourt.

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Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Author Ta-Nehisi Coates Speaks at Sold-Out UVM Event

Posted By on Wed, Nov 7, 2018 at 9:15 AM

Ta-Nehisi Coates - COURTESY OF GABRIELLA DEMCZUK
  • Courtesy of Gabriella Demczuk
  • Ta-Nehisi Coates
Best-selling author Ta-Nehisi Coates was 33 when he voted for the first time. That was in 2008 and he voted for Barack Obama, Coates told the 3,200-strong audience at the University of Vermont’s indoor tennis courts on Tuesday evening.

The West Baltimore, Md., native said he had a “very radical but limited view of politics." Coates had felt that voting was "bad" and thought he would end up endorsing “for the lesser evil, at best.” But a professor friend recently told him, “Yes, that’s true, but I’m in favor of less evil.”

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